2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

2000


Starting in the year 2000, EHEDG established the EL certification scheme for liquid handling equipment. The EL certificate was mainly meant for equipment intended to be cleaned in-place (CIP) without dismantling. The equipment was certified (and a logo placed on the equipment) if it was in accordance to EHEDG Document No. 8 on Hygienic design criteria. The equipment was subjected to practical testing using Guideline Doc. 2 to demonstrate compensation for non-compliance for essential technical or functional reasons and suitability for cleaning in-place applications. Prolongation was required annually and the EL certificate included only the original date of certification. In this original certification scheme, the date shown on the EL logo for each certified piece of equipment indicated that the equipment met the EHEDG design and evaluation criteria on that date and the date remained unchanged as long as the equipment design was not modified.

2009

Due to an increasing demand from the industry for certification of other component types, EHEDG revised the EL certification scheme in 2009 and introduced several new certificate types. Equipment was now categorized as Class I and Class II according to the equipment definitions, subject to be either cleaned in-place (Class I) or to be dismantled for cleaning (Class II). Equipment used in aseptic applications has been certified since that time according type EL Aseptic. Another special certificate type ED was created, being meant for equipment used for dry cleaning procedures.

Equipment certified after 2009 was evaluated according to the requirements mentioned in EHEDG Document No. 8 as well as to the criteria of any other EHEDG Guidelines describing the hygienic design of such equipment more specifically. Certificates issued after 2009 also mention any elastomers that were tested (if applicable) during the evaluation of the equipment.

2014

Based on an evolving knowledge in hygienic design, EHEDG published additional guideline documents in recent years and identified new assessment criteria for testing and certification. For the sake of food safety, equipment fulfilling the most recent design criteria is considered as the only one suitable for installation into food processing plants. In 2014, EHEDG therefore decided to review the whole certification process and introduced a revised certification scheme as well as new certification requirements. A new certification class was introduced for equipment used in open processes in close proximity to the product contact area, or for equipment which could have a potential influence on the product contact area, and where it could become soiled and must be cleaned in place. These types of equipment (e.g. conveyor drives, vision sensors, etc.) were newly categorized as type EL Class I AUX for auxiliary equipment. The existing type ED was divided into two categories according to the EHEDG definitions, type ED Class I (dry cleaning without dismantling) and type ED Class II (dry cleaning with dismantling).

Starting December 2014, a lifetime of 5 years was implemented for newly issued EHEDG certificates. Since then, all new certificates are due for review on a 5-years basis in order to determine if the requirements to testing and certification have changed for the respective equipment type. If so, the certificate is out of date and the equipment has to undergo the whole certification procedure again according to the latest criteria. As before, certificates are considered as no more valid in case of a design change. In addition to an annual prolongation as a proof that the design has remained unchanged, each certified piece of equipment needs renewal of its certification after 5 years. The 5-year renewal reaffirms to EHEDG and to the equipment users that the equipment meets the latest hygienic design criteria and certification procedures. After 5 years, the certified logo and the certificate itself will receive a new date of certification. Consequently, only new certificates (not older than 5 years) are up to date, while old certificates are based on the requirements valid at that time.

Traning and Education

EHEDG Autorisierte Gutachter

Die folgenden Personen sind von EHEDG autorisiert um Bauteile zu begutachten und Zertifizierungsunterlagen für die Benutzung des EHEDG Zertifizierungslogos zu erstellen:

Giampaolo Betta
Giampaolo Betta SIIIA

Phone: +390 340 6 97 58 69

Email: giampaolo.betta@gmail.com


Italy

it en
Yu Ming Chen
Yu Ming Chen FIRDI

Phone: +886 52 91 89 04

Email: cym@firdi.org.tw


Taiwan

tw en
Alan Friis
Alan Friis DTU National Food Institute

Phone: +45 42 482 482

Email: alfr@food.dtu.dk


Denmark

dk en
Jürgen Hofmann
Jürgen Hofmann TU München, Forschungszentrum Weihenstephan

Phone: +49 8161 8 76 87 99

Email: hofmann@ehedg-aeo.de


Germany

de en
Shih Rong Huang
Shih Rong Huang FIRDI

Phone: +886 52 91 89 10

Email: hsr@firdi.org.tw


Taiwan

tw en
Jacques Kastelein
Jacques Kastelein

Phone: +31 6 20 04 87 30

Email: jacqueskastelein@gmail.com


Netherlands

nl en
Irene Llorca
Irene Llorca ainia centro tecnológico

Phone: +34 96 1 36 60 90

Email: illorca@ainia.es


Spain

es en
Mark Morgan
Mark Morgan The University of Tennessee

Phone: +1 865 9 74 74 99

Email: Mark.Morgan@utk.edu


USA

en
Nicolas Rossi
Nicolas Rossi ACTALIA Sécurité des aliments

Phone: +33 2 31 25 43 00

Email: n.rossi@actalia.eu


France

fr en
Rafael Soro
Rafael Soro ainia centro tecnológico

Phone: +34 961 36 60 90

Email: rsoro@ainia.es


Spain

es en
Andy Timperley
Andy Timperley Timperley Consulting

Phone: +44 1789 49 00 81

Email: andyt@timperleyconsulting.co.uk


United Kindom

en